CCNA, Cisco

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200-120 vce

QUESTION 88
Which of these represents an IPv6 link-local address?
A. FE80::380e:611a:e14f:3d69
B. FE81::280f:512b:e14f:3d69
C. FEFE:0345:5f1b::e14d:3d69
D. FE08::280e:611:a:f14f:3d69

Correct Answer: A QUESTION 89
The network administrator is asked to configure 113 point-to-point links. Which IP addressing scheme defines the address range and subnet mask that meet the requirement and waste the fewest subnet and host addresses?
A. 10.10.0.0/16 subnetted with mask 255.255.255.252
B. 10.10.0.0/18 subnetted with mask 255.255.255.252
C. 10.10.1.0/24 subnetted with mask 255.255.255.252
D. 10.10.0.0/23 subnetted with mask 255.255.255.252
E. 10.10.1.0/25 subnetted with mask 255.255.255.252

Correct Answer: D QUESTION 90
A Cisco router is booting and has just completed the POST process. It is now ready to find and load an IOS image. What function does the router perform next?
A. It checks the configuration register.
B. It attempts to boot from a TFTP server.
C. It loads the first image file in flash memory.
D. It inspects the configuration file in NVRAM for boot instructions.

Correct Answer: A QUESTION 91
Refer to the exhibit.
What is the meaning of the output MTU 1500 bytes?
A. The maximum number of bytes that can traverse this interface per second is 1500.
B. The minimum segment size that can traverse this interface is 1500 bytes.
C. The maximum segment size that can traverse this interface is 1500 bytes.
D. The minimum packet size that can traverse this interface is 1500 bytes.
E. The maximum packet size that can traverse this interface is 1500 bytes.
F. The maximum frame size that can traverse this interface is 1500 bytes.

Correct Answer: E QUESTION 92
On a corporate network, hosts on the same VLAN can communicate with each other, but they are unable to communicate with hosts on different VLANs. What is needed to allow communication between the VLANs?
A. a router with subinterfaces configured on the physical interface that is connected to the switch
B. a router with an IP address on the physical interface connected to the switch
C. a switch with an access link that is configured between the switches
D. a switch with a trunk link that is configured between the switches

Correct Answer: A QUESTION 93
Which command displays CPU utilization?
A. show protocols
B. show process
C. show system
D. show version

Correct Answer: B

200-120 vce

QUESTION 94
What two things will a router do when running a distance vector routing protocol? (Choose two.)
A. Send periodic updates regardless of topology changes.
B. Send entire routing table to all routers in the routing domain.
C. Use the shortest-path algorithm to the determine best path.
D. Update the routing table based on updates from their neighbors.
E. Maintain the topology of the entire network in its database.

Correct Answer: AD QUESTION 95
Which command is used to display the collection of OSPF link states?
A. show ip ospf link-state
B. show ip ospf lsa database
C. show ip ospf neighbors
D. show ip ospf database

Correct Answer: D QUESTION 96
Refer to the exhibit.
Cisco 200-120 Exam The technician wants to upload a new IOS in the router while keeping the existing IOS. What is the maximum size of an IOS file that could be loaded if the original IOS is also kept in flash?

A. 3 MB
B. 4 MB
C. 5 MB
D. 7 MB
E. 8 MB

Correct Answer: B
QUESTION 97
Refer to the exhibit.

The two exhibited devices are the only Cisco devices on the network. The serial network between
Cisco 200-120 Exam the two devices has a mask of 255.255.255.252. Given the output that is shown, what three statements are true of these devices? (Choose three.)
A. The Manchester serial address is 10.1.1.1.
B. The Manchester serial address is 10.1.1.2.
C. The London router is a Cisco 2610.
D. The Manchester router is a Cisco 2610.
E. The CDP information was received on port Serial0/0 of the Manchester router.
F. The CDP information was sent by port Serial0/0 of the London router.

Correct Answer: ACE
QUESTION 98
If IP routing is enabled, which two commands set the gateway of last resort to the default gateway? (Choose two.)
A. ip default-gateway 0.0.0.0
B. ip route 172.16.2.1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0
C. ip default-network 0.0.0.0
D. ip default-route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.2.1
E. ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.2.1

Correct Answer: CE
QUESTION 99
Which parameter would you tune to affect the selection of a static route as a backup, when a dynamic protocol is also being used?
A. hop count
B. administrative distance
C. link bandwidth
D. link delay
E. link cost

Correct Answer: B
QUESTION 100
Refer to the exhibit.

A network associate has configured OSPF with the command:
City(config-router)# network 192.168.12.64 0.0.0.63 area 0
After completing the configuration, the associate discovers that not all the interfaces are participating in OSPF. Which three of the interfaces shown in the exhibit will participate in OSPF according to this configuration statement? (Choose three.)
A. FastEthernet0 /0
B. FastEthernet0 /1
C. Serial0/0
D. Serial0/1.102
E. Serial0/1.103
F. Serial0/1.104

Correct Answer: BCD QUESTION 101
Cisco 200-120 Exam Refer to the exhibit.

The Lakeside Company has the internetwork in the exhibit. The administrator would like to reduce the size of the routing table on the Central router. Which partial routing table entry in the Central router represents a route summary that represents the LANs in Phoenix but no additional subnets?
A. 10.0.0.0/22 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.0.0.0 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1
B. 10.0.0.0/28 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.2.0.0 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1
C. 10.0.0.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.2.2.0 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1
D. 10.0.0.0/22 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.4.0.0 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1
E. 10.0.0.0/28 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.4.4.0 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1
F. 10.0.0.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets D 10.4.4.4 [90/20514560] via 10.2.0.2, 6w0d, Serial0/1

Correct Answer: D
QUESTION 102
Cisco 200-120 Exam Refer to the graphic.

A static route to the 10.5.6.0/24 network is to be configured on the HFD router. Which commands will accomplish this? (Choose two.)
A. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.6.0 0.0.0.255 fa0/0
B. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.6.0 0.0.0.255 10.5.4.6
C. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.6.0 255.255.255.0 fa0/0
D. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.6.0 255.255.255.0 10.5.4.6
E. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.4.6 0.0.0.255 10.5.6.0
F. HFD(config)# ip route 10.5.4.6 255.255.255.0 10.5.6.0

Correct Answer: CD
QUESTION 103
Before installing a new, upgraded version of the IOS, what should be checked on the router, and which command should be used to gather this information? (Choose two.)
A. the amount of available ROM
B. the amount of available flash and RAM memory
C. the version of the bootstrap software present on the router
D. show version
E. show processes
F. show running-config

Correct Answer: BD
QUESTION 104
Which command reveals the last method used to powercycle a router?
A. show reload
B. show boot
C. show running-config
D. show version
Correct Answer: D
QUESTION 105
Which command would you use on a Cisco router to verify the Layer 3 path to a host?
A. tracert address
B. traceroute address
C. telnet address
D. ssh address
Correct Answer: B QUESTION 106
What information does a router running a link-state protocol use to build and maintain its topological database? (Choose two.)
A. hello packets
B. SAP messages sent by other routers
C. LSAs from other routers
D. beacons received on point-to-point links
E. routing tables received from other link-state routers
F. TTL packets from designated routers

Correct Answer: AC
QUESTION 107
Which statements describe the routing protocol OSPF? (Choose three.)
A. It supports VLSM.
B. It is used to route between autonomous systems.
C. It confines network instability to one area of the network.
D. It increases routing overhead on the network.
E. It allows extensive control of routing updates.
F. It is simpler to configure than RIP v2.

Correct Answer: ACE
QUESTION 108
Refer to the exhibit.

A network administrator configures a new router and enters the copy startup-config running-config command on the router. The network administrator powers down the router and sets it up at a remote location. When the router starts, it enters the system configuration dialog as shown. What is the cause of the problem?
A. The network administrator failed to save the configuration.
B. The configuration register is set to 0x2100.
C. The boot system flash command is missing from the configuration.
D. The configuration register is set to 0x2102.
E. The router is configured with the boot system startup command.

Correct Answer: A

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IBM, IBM Certified Administrator

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C2020-703 Practice Questions
Vendor Name: IBM
Exam code: C2020-703
Exam Name: IBM Cognos TM1 10.1 Administrator

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Question: 1

You want to deploy a new application using dimension calculations in Performance Modeler. The application will be deployed in distributed mode. Which two configuration parameters should be applied? (Choose two.)

  1. PersistentFeeders=T
  2. AllowSeparateNandCRules=T
  3. DistributedPlanningOutputDir=.\tunit
  4. LoggingDirectory=. . \log

Answer: B, C  

Question: 2

Support has requested that the customer increase the logging in their tm1s-log.properties file.

Where is this file found?

  1. In the same directory as the tm1 install
  2. In the same directory as the web.config file
  3. In the same directory as the tm1s.cfg file
  4. In the same directoryasthetm1p.ini file

Answer: C   

Question: 3

Which two TM1 Objects are potential data sources for a TurboIntegrator process? (Choose two.)

  1. Rule File
  2. Dimension Subset
  3. Cube View
  4. Application Folder

Answer: B, C   

C2020-703 exam

C2020-703 exam

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IBM: Test C2020-703: IBM Cognos TM1 10.1 Administrator

EMC

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NOTE
In Windows, instances
do not really have an instance owner, but the name of the instance, i.e., DB2, will be used in place of the instance owner¡¯s ID.
Because more than one database can be created on the same drive or directory, each database must have its own unique subdirectory. Under the NODExxxx directory, there will be an SQLxxxxx directory for every database that was created on the drive/directory. For example, there are two databases, MYDB and SAMPLE, that were both created on the C: drive on Windows, so there will be two directories: SQL00001 and SQL00002.
To determine under which directory the database was created, enter the command LIST DATABASE DIRECTORY ON C:. This will produce output like the following:
Database 1 entry:

Database alias Database name Database directoryDatabase release level
Comment

Directory entry typeCatalog database partiDatabase partition num
Database 2 entry:

Database alias Database name Database directoryDatabase release level
Comment

Directory entry typeCatalog database partiDatabase partition num
In the example above, the database SAMPLE would have been created in the SQL00001 directory, and the database MYDB would have been created in the SQL00002 directory under the NODExxxx directory.
Under the database¡¯s SQL0000x directory, DB2 will create one directory for each of the three default table spaces, unless the table spaces were defined to use different containers in the CREATE DATABASE command.
By default, the system catalog table space will use the directory SQLT0000.0, the system temporary table space will use the directory SQLT0001.0, and the default user table space (USERSPACE1) will use the directory SQLT0002.0.
There is also a subdirectory named SQLOGDIR to hold the database log files. This location can be changed once the database has been created.
Given the following command, execute in the instance named db2inst1.
create database sample o
On the Linux or UNIX server where database partition 0 is defined, the following directory structures are created:
/database/db2inst1/NODE0/database/db2inst1/NODE0
On the server where database partition 1 is defined, the following directory structures are created:
/database/db2inst1/NODE0/database/db2inst1/NODE0
These directories would be created as illustrated in Figure 1.3.
Figure 1.3. Directory
structure for multi-
partitioned database.
If a second database is created in the same instance (i.e., db2inst1) on the same path using the command:
create database sample o
the directory structure would then look like Figure
1.4.
Figure 1.4. Directory structure for two databases in a multi-partitioned database.

NOTE
The sqldbdir directory contains the database
directory, i.e., a listing of all databases that are in the drive / path.
Table Spaces

A table space is a logical entity used to define where tables and indexes will be stored within a database. All DB2 tables and indexes reside in table spaces, allowing complete control over where the table and index data are physically stored.
A table space can be created using one or more underlying physical storage devices called containers. This provides the ability to create a physical database design that provides optimal performance in any physical environment.
Details about the table spaces in a database can be obtained using:
1. GET SNAPSHOT FOR TABLESPACES ON <database name>

LIST TABLESPACES
Containers

A table space is a logical database entity; table space containers are the physical storage associated with a table space. A container definition depends on the type of table space being created and can be defined as an operating system directory, a logical device/drive name, or a file.
When a table space is created, it must have at least one container associated with it. A single table space can contain multiple containers, but a container can belong to only one table space.
Details about a table space¡¯s containers can be obtained using the LIST TABLESPACE CONTAINERS FOR x command, where x is the table space¡¯s ID. A table space¡¯s ID can be found using the LIST TABLESPACES command and searching for the table space of interest.
NOTE
In general, containers must reside on local disks and cannot be created on LAN-redirected drives, NFS-mounted file systems, or GPFS file systems.
Extents
The basic unit of storage in a DB2 database is the
page, and pages can be different sizes. When pages are written to disk, they are grouped into contiguous ranges called extents. The extent size for a table space is specified for the table space when it is created and cannot be changed.
The DFT_EXTENT_SZ database configuration parameter specifies the default extent size for all table spaces in the database. This value can be overridden when the table space is created, using the EXTENTSIZE parameter of the CREATE TABLESPACE statement.
When a table space is created with more than one container, DB2 will write the data to the containers in a round-robin fashion. DB2 will fill an extent in one container, then fill an extent in the next container, and so on, until it has written an extent in all of the containers in the table space. DB2 will then fill the second extent in the first container, and so on.
However, this may change if containers are added or removed using the ALTER TABLESPACE command.
In Figure 1.5, the first extent (Extent 0) is written to Container 0, Extent 1 is written to Container 1, Extent 2 is written to Container 2. At this point, there is one extent in each of the containers, so DB2 will go back to the first container and add the next extent. Therefore, Extent 3 is written to Container 0, Extent 4 is written to Container 1, and so on, as more data is added.
Figure 1.5. Extents written to containers.

NOTE
The first extent (extent 0) for each object can start in different containers. Not all objects start in container
0.
Creating Table Spaces

Creating a table space within a database assigns the specified containers to the table space and records the table space and container definitions and attributes in the database. When creating a table space, it is important to consider the following:

What type of data the table space will hold Regular dataData or Index Large/Long data Temporary data What management type will be used System Managed Space (SMS) Database Managed Space

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Cisco

http://www.examcoop.com/100-101.html

Exam A
QUESTION 1
How does a switch differ from a hub?
A. A switch does not induce any latency into the frame transfer time.
B. A switch tracks MAC addresses of directly-connected devices.
C. A switch operates at a lower, more efficient layer of the OSI model.
D. A switch decreases the number of broadcast domains.
E. A switch decreases the number of collision domains.
Correct Answer: B

QUESTION 2
What must occur before a workstation can exchange HTTP packets with a web server?
A. A UDP connection must be established between the workstation and its default gateway.
B. A UDP connection must be established between the workstation and the web server.
C. A TCP connection must be established between the workstation and its default gateway.
D. A TCP connection must be established between the workstation and the web server.
E. An ICMP connection must be established between the workstation and its default gateway.
F. An ICMP connection must be established between the workstation and the web server.
Correct Answer: D

QUESTION 3
How does TCP differ from UDP? (Choose two.)
A. TCP provides best effort delivery.
B. TCP provides synchronized communication.
C. TCP segments are essentially datagrams.
D. TCP provides sequence numbering of packets.
E. TCP uses broadcast delivery.
Correct Answer: BD

QUESTION 4
A workstation has just resolved a browser URL to the IP address of a server. What protocol will the workstation now use to determine the destination MAC address to be placed into frames directed toward the server?
A. HTTP
B. DNS
C. DHCP
D. RARP
E. ARP
Correct Answer: E
QUESTION 5
Refer to the exhibit.

Host A is sending a packet to Host B for the first time. What destination MAC address will Host A use in the ARP request?
A. 192.168.0.1
B. 172.16.0.50
C. 00-17-94-61-18-b0
D. 00-19-d3-2d-c3-b2
E. ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff

F. 255.255.255.255
Correct Answer: E

QUESTION 6
The network manager has requested a 300-workstation expansion of the network. The workstations are to be installed in a single broadcast domain, but each workstation must have its own collision domain. The expansion is to be as cost-effective as possible while still meeting the requirements. Which three items will adequately fulfill the request? (Choose three).
A. one IP subnet with a mask of 255.255.254.0
B. two IP subnets with a mask of 255.255.255.0
C. seven 48-port hubs
D. seven 48-port switches
E. one router interface
F. seven router interfaces
Correct Answer: ADE

QUESTION 7
What are two common TCP applications? (Choose two.)
A. TFTP
B. SMTP
C. SNMP
D. FTP
E. DNS
Correct Answer: BD
QUESTION 8
Refer to the exhibit.

SwitchA receives the frame with the addressing shown. According to the command output also shown in the exhibit, how will SwitchA handle this frame?
A. It will drop the frame.
B. It will forward the frame out port Fa0/3 only.
C. It will flood the frame out all ports.
D. It will flood the frame out all ports except Fa0/3.

Correct Answer: D QUESTION 9
Refer to the exhibit.

SwitchA receives the frame with the addressing shown in the exhibit. According to the command output also shown in the exhibit, how will SwitchA handle this frame?
A. It will drop the frame.
B. It will forward the frame out port Fa0/6 only.
C. It will forward the frame out port Fa0/3 only.
D. It will flood the frame out all ports.
E. It will flood the frame out all ports except Fa0/3.

Correct Answer: B QUESTION 10
Refer to the exhibit.

The exhibit is showing the topology and the MAC address table. Host A sends a data frame to host D. What will the switch do when it receives the frame from host A?
A. The switch will add the source address and port to the MAC address table and forward the frame to host D.
B. The switch will discard the frame and send an error message back to host A.
C. The switch will flood the frame out of all ports except for port Fa0/3.
D. The switch will add the destination address of the frame to the MAC address table and forward the frame to host D.

Correct Answer: A

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Cisco

http://www.examcoop.com/642-770.html

Exam A
QUESTION 1
You have just solved a troublesome network event. From a troubleshooting perspective, what is your next step?
A. Secure the device you performed the change an.
B. Document the problem and what you did to correct it.
C. Close the ticket.
D. Notify the service desk.

Correct Answer: B Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 2
Which command could be used to verify that the software upgrade change was completed properly on a Cisco IOS router?
A. show software version
B. show version
C. show disk
D. show target configuration
E. show upgrade complete

Correct Answer: B Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 3
What are two valid reasons to upgrade Cisco IOS XR Software? (Choose two.)
A. A few software bugs that have no service impact.
B. There are no rules for this device in the policy table.
C. A new line card needs to be added, and it is not supported in the current installed release.
D. Current bandwidth utilization is poor, and bandwidth efficiency needs to be increased.
E. Already running BGP, and need a specific BGP feature that is not supported in current installed release.

Correct Answer: CD Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 4
A router in your network has been reporting threshold crossing alarms over the past few weeks. Investigation into these alarms has not yielded a specific cause and end users attached to the device have not complained about access to services or their performance. What is most the most likely reason for these threshold crossing alarms?
A. It is an intermittent problem and will be very difficult to troubleshoot.
B. It is likely that a hardware problem will reveal itself when the hardware degrades future.
C. It is likely that the threshold setting that is alarming is too low for this particularly platform in Build Your Dreams PassGuide 642-770 its particularly situation.
D. It is likely a software or firmware problem and will fix itself in a future upgrade.

Correct Answer: C Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 5
Which three areas could be impacted by a change in the network environment? (Chose three)
A. as-built network documentation
B. disaster recovery plan
C. critical success factors
D. service level agreements
E. network management KPI

Correct Answer: ABD Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 6
According to Cisco IOS Management Best Practices, which three attribute should be fulfilled in the Device Naming Convention? (Choose three)
A. identify the device
B. name the device
C. device type
D. device location
E. device hierarchy

Correct Answer: ACD Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:

QUESTION 7
What are the primary areas of analysis in measuring network performance? (Choose four)
A. traffic trend analysis
B. service take-up trend analysis
C. NetFlow analysis
D. Change rate analysis
E. incident rate analysis
F. syslog analysis
Correct Answer: ABDE Section: (none) Explanation

Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 8
According ITIL ?v3 framework, what is the objective of the release and deployment process?
A. reduce unpredicted impact in the production services Build Your Dreams PassGuide 642-770
B. ensure releases are deployed an time
C. reduce network outages
D. ensure that devices are configured appropriately

Correct Answer: A Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 9
Cisco IOS XR Software was designed with three partitions or separate planes. Which are the three planes?
A. control, data, and management
B. application, data, and management
C. control, services, and management
D. application, services, and data
E. data, services, and control

Correct Answer: A Section: (none) Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 10
You need to add a new DNS server to your Linux server. Where would you have to add the new DNS entry in the operating system?
A. /etc/hosts
B. /etc/hosts.conf
C. /etc/sysconfig/network
D. /etc/nsswitch.conf
E. /etc/resolv.conf

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Microsoft

70-086
70-086 15

Preventing Problems

423

Keeping Your System Up to 70-086 70-086 exam dumps free Date with Windows Update  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .424 Checking for and Installing Available Updates  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .427 Using File History in Windows 8  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .429 Turning On File History  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .435 Restoring Files with File History  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .437 Using System Restore  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 440 Launching System Restore  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 441 Restoring to a Previous State with System Restore  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 443 Using the Action Center  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 447 Configuring the Messages Action Center Shows  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .450 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .452

Contents

ix

16

Supervising a Child’s Computer Use

455

Turning on Family Safety .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .456 Setting Time Limits and Application Restrictions  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .459 Setting Restrictions for Games and Windows Store Apps .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 468 Setting Restrictions for Websites and Downloads  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .473 Understanding Messages Family Safety Shows .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .478 Managing Family Safety Settings and Viewing Activity Reports  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .479 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 483

17

Making My Computer Accessible

485

Accessing the Ease of Access Center .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 486 Letting Windows Suggest Ease of Access Settings  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 489 Using the Magnifier  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .492 Using Narrator  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 496 Using the On-Screen Keyboard  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 498 Set Up and Use Windows Speech Recognition  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 502 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 507

18

Using Windows 8 at Work

509

Using the Windows Mobility Center  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .510 Turning On Presentation Mode  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .512 Using BitLocker to Encrypt Drives  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .515 Encrypting the Operating System Drive with BitLocker .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .518 Encrypting Removable Data Drives with BitLocker .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .526 Accessing an Encrypted Removable Drive  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 529 Decrypting a BitLocker-Protected Drive  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 530 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .531

x

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19

Using Windows 8 on Touch-Compatible Devices 533

Setting Up Touch Hardware  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 534 Learning General Touch Gestures  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .537 Using Multi-Touch Gestures  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .541 Changing Touch-Input Settings  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 542 Using the Math Input Panel  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 546 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 549

20

20 Tips for Improving Your Windows 8 Computing Experience

551

Adding Shut Down, Restart, Sign Out, and Other Shortcuts to the Start Screen  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .552 Adding a Show Start Shortcut to the Desktop  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 554 Adding a Control Panel Shortcut to the Start Screen .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 554 Naming Groups of Shortcuts on the Start Screen  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .556 Adding Clocks and Time Zones to the Windows Taskbar  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .559 Adding the Recycle Bin to the Windows Taskbar  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .561 Using the Hidden System Menu  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 562 Logging On to Windows 8 Automatically, Without Entering Your Password Each Time  .  . 563 Running an Application as Administrator  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .565 Adding or Removing Windows Features  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 567 Turning Off Notifications for Windows 8 Apps  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .570 Defragmenting a Disk Drive Manually  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .573 Freeing Up Disk Space with Disk Cleanup  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .575 Changing the Location of the Downloads Folder and Other User Folders  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .578 Burning a Disc with File Explorer  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .581 Accessing SkyDrive from the Desktop and File Explorer  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 584 Using Shortened URLs When You Want to Share Files from SkyDrive  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 586 Five Ways to 70-086 exam 70-086 exam dumps Launch Task Manager in Windows 8  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 589 Optimizing Startup Items with Task Manager  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .591 Changing the Defaults for Programs, File Extensions, and AutoPlay Dialog Boxes  .  .  .  .  .  .  .595 Key Points  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .599

IBM

000-563
.
Table of Contents

.
Index

MySQL. Tutorial
By Luke Welling, Laura Th
Publisher : Sams Publish Pub Date : November 04 ISBN : 0-672-32584 Pages : 300

The MySQL Tutorial consists of a series of 000-563 short, very concise chapters, each on a tightly targeted topic, with a task-oriented focus. Each chapter is written so it can be read in a single sitting and be easily digested. The main focus is on five key areas: installation and configuration, using MySQL, administering MySQL, optimizing MySQL, and MySQL¡¯s associated APIs. With 4 million installations and 27,000 downloads per day, MySQL continues to grow as one of the most widely used databases in the world. Now an enterprise-level database, MySQL features full support for transactions, integrating improvements that enhance MySQL¡¯s architectural foundation for building
heavy-load
commercial
applications.

.
Table of Contents

.
Index

MySQL. Tutorial

By Luke Welling, Laura Th
Publisher : Sams Publish Pub Date : November 04 ISBN : 0-672-32584 Pages : 300
Copyright About the Authors Acknowledgments We Want to Hear from You! Reader Services Introduction
Why Use MySQL? Why MySQL Instead of Ano What¡¯s Different in MySQL 4 What Features Are Still to C Who Should Read This Boo How This Book Works
A Note on MySQL Licensing Part I: MySQL Basics Chapter 1. Installing MySQ Installing on Linux Installing on Windows Installing on OS X Configuring Your System Checking Your System Wo Setting the Root Passwor Deleting Anonymous Acco Creating an Account for B Summary Exercises Next Chapter 2. Quick Tour MySQL Directory Structure
Overview of Executables Overview of User Interfac Quick Introduction to the Summary Quiz Exercises Answers Next
Part II: Designing and Creati
Chapter 3. Database Desig Database Concepts and T Database Design Principl Normalization Summary Quiz Exercises Answers
Next Chapter 4. Creating Datab Case Sensitivity Identifiers in MySQL Creating a Database Selecting a Database Creating Tables Column and Data Types i Creating Indexes Deleting Databases, Tabl Altering Existing Table St Summary Quiz Exercises Answers
Next
Part III: Using MySQL
Chapter 5. Inserting, Delet
Using INSERT
Using REPLACE
Using DELETE
Using TRUNCATE
Using UPDATE
Uploading Data with LOA
Summary
Quiz
Exercises
Answers
Next
Chapter 6. Querying MySQ Overview of SELECT
Simple Queries Selecting Particular Colum Specifying Absolute Data Aliases Using the WHERE Clause Removing Duplicates with Using the GROUP BY Clau Selecting Particular Group Sorting Search Results w Limiting Search Results w Summary Quiz Exercises Answers Next
Chapter 7. Advanced Queri

Using Joins to Run Querie
Understanding the Differe Writing Subqueries Using SELECT Statement Summary Quiz Exercises Answers Next Chapter 8. Using MySQL Bu Operators Control Flow Functions String Functions Numeric Functions Date and Time Functions
Cast Functions

Other Functions Functions for Use with GR
Summary

Quiz

Exercises

Answers

Next

Part IV: MySQL Table Types a Chapter 9. Understanding ISAM Tables MyISAM Tables InnoDB Tables BerkeleyDB (BDB) Tables
MERGE Tables

HEAP Tables
Summary
Quiz

Exercises

Answers

Next

Chapter 10. Using Transact What Are Transactions? Using Transactions in MyS The InnoDB Transaction M Summary Quiz
Exercises

Answers
Next
Part V: Administering MySQL Chapter 11. Managing Use
Creating User Accounts w Privilege Levels ibm 000-563 Evaluating Privileges Using the REVOKE Statem Understanding the Privile Summary Quiz Exercises Answers Next Chapter 12. Configuring My
Setting MySQL Configurat Setting InnoDB Configura Multi-Install Configuratio Configuring for Internatio
Summary
Quiz
Exercises

CompTIA, CompTIA Cloud Essentials

CLOUD
CompTIA. Authorized Courseware
for Exam CLO-001

Kirk Hausman
Susan L. Cook
Telmo Sampaio
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To my half brother Fernando Barros. For being there for
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—Telmo Sampaio
About the Authors

Kirk Hausman has been an IT professional for more than 20 years, working in state government, health care, and higher education and as an enterprise archi-tect and security consultant. He is the co-author of IT Architecture for Dummies (Wiley, 2010) and the upcoming 3D Printing for Dummies (Wiley, 2013). Kirk teaches information security, digital forensics, and networking, and his research includes social media management, cyberterrorism, additive manufacturing (3D printing), and strategies for developing interest in young learners toward STEM subjects. He has facilitated cloud initiatives using Amazon EC2, Azure, and high-performance computing technologies. Kirk holds a master’s degree in information technology and a range of professional certi. cations, including PMP, CGEIT, CISSP, CISA, CISM, and CRISC. Kirk can be reached via kkhausman @hotmail.com.
Susan Cook has been an IT professional for over 15 years and has professional experience in higher education, state government, and .nancial sectors. Prior to her career in IT, she worked as a compliance auditor and as a licensed pri-vate investigator. She is the coauthor of IT Architecture for Dummies (Wiley, 2010), and her educational projects include bachelor’s level course development in networking and network security. She is currently employed by Texas A&M University and specializes in enterprise risk assessment and compliance. She has master’s degrees in information technology and security management and several IT certi.cations, including ISACA’s Certi.ed Information Systems Auditor (CISA) and Certi.ed in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC). Susan can be reached at [email protected]
Telmo Sampaio is the chief geek for MCTrainer.NET and TechKnowLogical, specializing in System Center, SharePoint, SQL, and .NET. Telmo wrote his . rst application in 1984, with the intent of demonstrating physics concepts to his fel-low classmates. His passion for technology and teaching made him a self-taught developer from an early age. In 1989 he moved to Wellesley, Massachusetts, when his father was transferred to work in Boston for a year. He kept developing appli-cations to demonstrate science and math concepts and decided to remain in the United States after his family left. In 1990, while still in high school, he was hired by IBM to demonstrate its most powerful CAD application, CATIA, to corporate customers like Boeing. In 1991 he moved back to Brazil and studied systems analysis at PUC/RJ. When Microsoft extended its Microsoft Certi. cation program to Brazil, Telmo was one of the .rst in the country to become certi.ed. In 1994 he started teaching Microsoft classes. Soon he was managing the largest training center in Latin America, after having worked for Microsoft in Brazil as a techni-cal account manager. To date he has been certi.ed in over 20 different Microsoft products, passing over 80 exams. After moving back to the United States in 2003, Telmo became a contributor to several Microsoft certi.cation exams, an author for of.cial courseware, and a speaker at events such as TechEd, PASS, and MMS.

Acknowledgments

Just as technologies in the cloud involve many different components to pro-vide the .nal product to the consumer, so too does a book like this require the dedication and focused effort of many whose names are not presented on the cover. I would .rst like to thank my coauthors, Susan Cook and Telmo Sampaio, but also the many excellent people at Sybex who took my rough material and polished it into a gem for readers: our acquisitions editor, Jeff Kellum; develop-ment editor, Kim Wimpsett; production editor, Rebecca Anderson; and the many other editorial reviewers that are simply amazing in what they do. I offer thanks to my good friend and literary agent, Carole Jelen, whose efforts provide me the chance to work with so many amazing people on so many exciting topics.
—Kirk Hausman
It is amazing to me how many people contribute to the creation of a published work. They all deserve thanks, but I’m particularly grateful to a special few at Sybex—Jeff Kellum in his dual role as acquisitions editor and chief cat herder, development editor Kim Wimpsett, and production editor Rebecca Anderson. I would also like to thank my agent, Carole Jelen, and my coauthors, Kirk Hausman and Telmo Sampaio, for all their hard work.
—Susan Cook
I would like to acknowledge the amazing contribution of my best friend and gorgeous wife, Jo Sampaio, who spent countless nights caring for the kids so that I could .nish this book. Without her support and understanding I would not be where I am today. My boys, Marco, Rafael and Enzo, for being supportive and giving up a bit of dad time. And my family back home in Brazil, who pretend to understand what I write about.
—Telmo Sampaio

Contents at a Glance

CompTIA Certi. cation xiii Introduction xvii
CHAPTER 1 What Is Cloud Computing? 1 CHAPTER 2 Cloud Models 15 CHAPTER 3 Service Models 29 CHAPTER 4 Current Cloud Technologies 47 CHAPTER 5 Cloud Business Value 75 CHAPTER 6 Cloud Infrastructure Planning 87 CHAPTER 7 Strategies for Cloud Adoption 105 CHAPTER 8 Applications in the Cloud 119 CHAPTER 9 Cloud Service Rollout 141 CHAPTER 10 Cloud Service-Level Management 157 CHAPTER 11 Security in the Cloud 177 CHAPTER 12 Privacy and Compliance 197 APPENDIX A Future of the Cloud 211 APPENDIX B Answers to Review Questions 217 APPENDIX C CompTIA’s Certi. cation Program 233 APPENDIX D EXIN’s Certi. cation Program 239
Glossary 245 Index 257

Contents

Chapter . Chapter .Chapter .Chapter . CompTIA Certi. cation xiii Introduction xvii What Is Cloud Computing? 1 De.ning Cloud Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Understanding Distributed Application Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Understanding Resource Management Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Understanding Virtualized Computing Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Understanding High-Performance Computing Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Understanding Cloud Computing Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Cloud Models 15 Evolving from Virtualization to the Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Planning Organizational Roles in the Cloud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Identifying Cloud Deployment Models and Scope Modi.ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Cloud Deployment Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Model Scope Modi.ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Including Future Cloud Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Service Models Categorizing Cloud Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Examining Software as a Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Examining Platform as a Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Examining Infrastructure as a Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Identifying Emerging Cloud Database Capabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Sharding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Database Pro.ling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 De.ning Everything as a Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Current Cloud Technologies
Comparing Traditional Technologies and Cloud Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Accessing the Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Networking in the Cloud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Web Access Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Leveraging Software as a Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Personal Software as a Service Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Enterprise Software as a Service Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Cloud-Speci.c Software as a Service Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Developing within Platform as a Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Implementing Infrastructure as a Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Empowering Mobile Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Chapter . Cloud Business Value 75
Identifying Business Drivers for Cloud Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Reducing Costs and Increasing Ef.ciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Increasing Organizational Agility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Examining the Business Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Evaluating Cloud Computing Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Identifying Value Now and in the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Choosing the Appropriate Cloud Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Making the Right Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Chapter . Cloud Infrastructure Planning 87
Understanding Cloud Networks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 The Open Systems Interconnection Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Internet Protocol Version. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Network Challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Infrastructural Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Leveraging Automation and Self-Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Understanding Federated Cloud Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Achieving Interoperability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Cloud Computing Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Chapter . Strategies for Cloud Adoption 105
Aligning Cloud Deployments with Organizational Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Identifying the Impact of Cloud Adoption to Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Culture and Business Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Management Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Testing for Readiness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Understanding the Importance of Service-Level Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Cloud Service-Level Agreements (SLAs). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Chapter . Applications in the Cloud 119
Understanding the Role of Standard Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Desktop Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Distributed Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Web-Based Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Cloud Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Developing Cloud-Ready Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Cloud-Ready Application Patterns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Cloud-Ready Application Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Migrating Applications to the Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Preparing for Technical Challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Identifying and Mitigating Risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Chapter . Cloud Service Rollout 141
Identifying Vendor Roles and Responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Identifying Organizational Skill Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Software as a Service (SaaS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Platform as a Service (PaaS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Transitioning to Live Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Preparing for Incident Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Chapter .. Cloud Service-Level Management 157
Understanding ITIL Service Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 ITIL Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Applying ITIL to Cloud Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Planning the Service Strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Planning a Service Desk Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Developing and Utilizing Performance Metrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Running a Cloud Service Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 General Performance Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Implementing Continual Process Improvement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Service Evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172

Process Evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 De.nition of Improvement Initiatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 CSI Monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Chapter .. Security in the Cloud 177
Understanding Security and Risk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Key Principles of Information Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Risk Management Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Reviewing Security Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Exploring Common Security Risks and Mitigations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Application Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Shared Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Insider and Criminal Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Data Exposure and Loss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Organizational Risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Implementing an ISMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Responding to Incidents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Digital Forensics in the Cloud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Recognizing Security Bene.ts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Chapter .. Privacy and Compliance 197
Identifying Legal Risks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Records Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Software Licensing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Audit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Identifying Privacy Risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Safe Harbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Managing Identity in the Cloud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Federated Identity Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Single Sign-On. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
The Essentials and Beyond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Appendix A: Future of the Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Appendix B: Answers to Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Appendix C: CompTIA’s Certi.cation Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Appendix D: EXIN’s Certi.cation Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
CompTIA Certi. cation
Qualify for Jobs, Promotions and Increased Compensation

The CompTIA Cloud Essentials specialty certi. cation demonstrates that an individual knows what cloud computing means from a business and technical perspective, as well as, at a high level, what is involved in moving to and governing the cloud.
It Pays to Get Certified
In a digital world, digital literacy is an essential survival skill. Certi. cation proves you have the knowledge and skill to solve business problems in virtu-ally any business environment. Certi.cations are highly valued credentials that qualify you for jobs, increased compensation, and promotion.

. Organizations do not have adequate cloud competencies espe-cially infrastructure and service providers. Excellent job opportunities exist and will grow for knowledgeable cloud professionals.
.
The cloud is a new frontier that requires astute personnel who understand the strategic impact of cloud computing on an organization.

.
Research has shown that certi.ed IT professionals score better when tested for their knowledge of foundational principles and skills, and from the employer’s perspective, certi.cation provides solid evidence of successful training.

.
Cloud technologies and business needs are moving faster than organi-zations can adapt. Therefore staff understanding of cloud computing is key for the initial project planning for cloud solutions, and a safe and well-managed implementation of any cloud project.

.
Getting your people up to speed with a fundamental  clo-001 pdf understand-ing of cloud computing enables the whole organization to speak the same language.

IBM

It’s not about whether Tim Cook is right or wrong. Apple Inc.’s standoff against the U.S. government’s mounting pressure to hack into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters highlights the importance of having clear leadership values in place. Otherwise, when a crisis arises, a company will be on the defensive 000-130 and scrambling to respond, creating uncertainty and eroding trust among customers and business partners. Despite pressure from the Justice Department, Apple CEO Tim Cook has refused to order his company to make software to unlock the phone used by one of the attackers to give the government access to encrypted personal data. According BH0-013 to Reuters, Cook reportedly told employees in an email, “This case is about much more than a single phone or a single investigation. At stake is the data security of hundreds of millions of law-abiding people, and setting a dangerous precedent that threatens everyone’s civil liberties.” The purpose here is not to weigh in on what Cook should or should not do in the midst of a crisis that touches two of the most emotionally-charged issues of our day: guarding against terrorism and personal data security. That said, one of the key principles of values-based leadership 98-349 is to take the time to understand the multiple perspective surrounding any issue — particularly the most critical ones. In the case of Apple 0.00% , it appears Cook is trying to determine the right actions for his company and its customers, such as urging the government to create a panel on encryption. This process could facilitate dialogue and understanding among the multiple perspective on the issue. A values-based leadership approach also focuses intently on the issue of trust. The Trust Project at Northwestern University, a new initiative launching in March, is designed to advance the study and management of trust in business in society, and shows that trust is 250-310 multifaceted. Using a simple example, customers may trust that a company’s products are backed with in-depth technical expertise. But those same customers may have lower levels of trust that the company is really looking out for their best interest, such as 117-101 in product pricing, technical support, or customer relations. Trust, like everything else is business, cannot be taken for granted, and it must be managed as part of values-based leadership. Being a values-based leader in an organization NS0-156 that prides itself on what it stands for is relatively easy when things are going well. However, personal and organizational leadership are defined by challenges — especially change, controversy, and crisis. During these times, leadership is tested, often publicly with high visibility, broadcasting the values of the leader and the organization to the world. The backbone of every crisis-response plan must be the 070-464 company’s values. Then, as simplistic as it may seem, the company and its leaders need always to do two things: do the right thing and do the best they can. Throughout my A00-211 career, including as chairman and CEO of Baxter International, a $12 billion healthcare company, I have defined values-based leadership in the context of four principles: self-reflection, to gain greater self-knowledge and accountability to my commitments; balance, to gather input and feedback from all sources to make the best decisions possible; true self-confidence, knowing what I know and acknowledging what I don’t know; and genuine humility, to treat everyone with respect. These values along with the commitment to do the right thing and the C2180-275 best I could helped me face numerous episodes of change, controversy, and even crisis. In 2001, a dialysis filter product made in a Swedish plant owned by Baxter was blamed for 53 deaths in several countries. Suddenly, the company’s name was on the front page of newspapers around the world, accused of causing these C4040-122 deaths. With values-based leadership and a commitment to do the right thing, we quickly mobilized our response: putting together a team to uncover the cause of the deaths; taking the appropriate actions, including closing the facility that made filters; meeting with health ministers in various countries; and sharing information with suppliers and even competitors, just in case they were using materials or had manufacturing processes similar to ours. We didn’t stop there. Even though Baxter’s financial results that year exceeded targets, I recommended to the board that they reduce my bonus by 40%, and my 20 senior JN0-343 executives agreed to cut their bonuses by 20%. We knew the world was watching, and in order to maintain trust with all our constituents, especially the 50,000 team members within Baxter, we needed to make sure we did the right thing. The eyes of the world are on Apple as it squares off against the Justice Department over an issue that has many sides and valid C2020-011 arguments, from the need to safeguard against terrorism to individuals’ rights to privacy. Regardless of what Apple decides, the company must remain guided by its values and principles, with a commitment to do the right thing and the best it can.

IBM To Acquire Resilient Systems, Undercut Cisco, Symantec, FireEye

ech giant IBM (IBM) plans to undercut Cisco Systems (CSCO), Symantec (SYMC), FireEye (FEYE) and Rapid7 (RPD) by acquiring incident response firm Resilient Systems and partnering 070-178 with endpoint security provider Carbon Black, the company announced Monday. The announcement comes a week after IBM HP2-K34 unveiled a deeper tie to No. 1 cybersecurity pure-play Check Point Software Technology (CHKP) to pool research and integrate systems. IBM stock slipped 0.8% to close at 131.03 on the stock market today. IBD’s 25-company Computer Software-Security industry group was down a fraction Monday as companies headed to the RSA Conference, a massive cybersecurity industry gathering that 070-458 runs all week in San Francisco. Caleb Barlow, vice president A30-327 of IBM Security, described the Resilient Systems acquisition as the cornerstone of a three-prong strategy to protect, defend and respond to cyberbreaches. Per IBM policy, he wouldn’t disclose the price tag for the privately held, 100-employee company. “This ultimately gives us the ability to expand from protecting and 642-980 defending the enterprise to also being able to respond to a breach,” Barlow told IBD. “This combination of a new acquisition and the associated partnerships really make a move into the incident-response space.”

Carbon Black Has Big Share Of Endpoint Security

In conjunction with the acquisition, IBM will partner with endpoint security firm Carbon Black. Privately held Carbon 700-301 Black owns 37% of the endpoint market, according to industry tracker IDC. Carbon Black’s platform will allow IBM analysts to conduct security forensics on compromised endpoint devices. Resilient Systems will be integrated into IBM’s incident-response 642-980 platform, dubbed X-Force Incident Response Services. Via X-Force, IBM will counsel clients through all parts of a cyberbreach and on ways to avoid such breaches. Barlow likened the service to a fire drill. “Most companies don’t have 250-371 good incident-response plans,” he said. “There’s a binder on the shelf for what to do in the case of a fire or what to do in the case of a flood, but not necessarily what to do in the case of a cyber incident.” That “binder” includes pertinent leadership, disclosure and public 1Z0-597 relations keys in case of a breach, he said. IBM’s move allows the company to “pivot” from protecting and defending to responding to a breach, he says. It’s all part of IBM’s push into the cybersecurity market. In 2015, IBM pulled in $2 billion in security revenue. That was up 12% but still accounted for only 2.4% of IBM’s total revenue of 074-343 more than $81 billion, which fell 12%. But the dollar amount topped total sales for security pure-players Palo Alto Networks (PANW), Proofpoint (PFPT), Fortinet (FTNT) and FireEye. And IBM’s security business also outgrew Symantec and Check Point. The security unit was launched four years ago, Barlow 000-130 dumps free says. Since then, it has added 7,300 employees — 1,000 last year alone — and operates in 133 countries globally. “Imagine if that were the conversation about a Silicon Valley startup,” he said. IBM gets a not-strong IBD 1Z0-532 Composite Rating of 53 out of a possible 99. Shares are down 5% year to date, like the S&P 500 index.